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Paulette Jordan and Brad Little take to air on Boise's 670 KBOI

The format of the shows was a bit different, with Jordan fielding questions from listeners as well as the radio host. Little was questioned only by the radio hosts. (CBS 2 photo)

Republican candidate for governor Brad Little appeared on 670 KBOI Monday, just a few days after Democratic candidate for governor Paulette Jordan made her own appearance on the radio station.

The format of the shows was a bit different, with Jordan fielding questions from listeners as well as the radio host.

Little was questioned only by the radio hosts.

During their separate appearances a few days apart, both candidates for governor were asked about their backgrounds.

Little as a rancher from Emmett.

Is there something that makes a rancher a better politician? Little was asked.

"I hope so," Little, an Emmett rancher, replied with a laugh.

And Jordan as a Native American activist.

"I'm not here to offend you, but simply represent myself and the lineage I come from," said Jordan, a member of the Coeur d'Alene tribe. "For those who feel challenged by that, I say we're all in this together."

Both disagreed on Proposition One, the ballot initiative to legalize those instant horse racing video terminals.

Little is for it.

"Because of what it does for rural Idaho," he said. " Emmett, Malad, of course here in Boise, too. I support paramutel horse racing."

Jordan is against it.

"This (Proposition One) is not about horse racing itself. It's about those slot machine-like terminals which are against the constitution," Jordan said. "But if it passes Nov. 6, I would support the will of the people."

Jordan fully supports Proposition Two, the expansion of Medicaid.

Little is undecided.

"Because this is part of a big government program," Little said. "I'm still weighing the ramifications of it."

I pressed the issue further after the show, asking if he's on the fence, is he leaning one way or another?

"I'm on the fence predicated on as we get closer...there are initiatives by the White House and Congress that are going to impact it one way or another," he said.

And on the show, Jordan said the much-publicized turnover of her top campaign staff is a normal part of politics.

"It happens everywhere," she said. "Everywhere."

And Jordan said there is nothing inappropriate about her involvement with a super PAC to help tribal issues.

"I don't have any money coming from Super PACS via me to my campaign," Jordan said.

In this unprecedented race for governor, the difference between the two candidates is expansive.

Little is the traditional Republican establishment candidate with extensive legislative experience while Jordan, a former state representative, is the outsider who took control of the Democratic Party in Idaho by energizing a base that defied the Democrats' traditional approach to campaigning.

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