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How geothermal energy heats the city of Boise

In 1999, the city installed an injection well at Julia Davis Park which allows every gallon that is taken out of the ground to be put back into the exact same aquifer— making the City of Boise a sustainable closed loop system.

There are only a handful of places around the country that are able to use geothermal energy — Boise is home to the nation's largest system.

There's a fault line in the Boise Foothills, where historically there have been dozens of hot springs, which has been being tapped into now for 35 years as a way to provide heat for the city.

There are 92 building downtown that are heated using geothermal energy — among them are several hotels, the YMCA, Boise High School, City Hall, the Ada County Courthouse, and parts of Boise State University.

It's a clean, renewable resource, according to the city's geothermal coordinator Jon Gunnerson.

Nowhere in the system can the water actually be consumed, but rather is only used for the heat that it puts off.

In 1999, the city installed an injection well at Julia Davis Park which allows every gallon that is taken out of the ground to be put back into the exact same aquifer— making the City of Boise a sustainable closed loop system.

Watch the video above to take a tour of how the city's geothermal system works.

To understand more about the history of the system click here.

To learn more about the future of the system click here.


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