MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

H.E.L.P. for the homeless: A shelter on wheels

Tylar Hedrick, a sophomore at Renaissance High School, is working to create Homeless Emergency Life Packs, or H.E.L.P. (KBOI Staff Photo)

A high school student in the Treasure Valley is determined to give those who are homeless a better quality of living.

Tylar Hedrick, a sophomore at Renaissance High School, is working to create Homeless Emergency Life Packs, or H.E.L.P.

Tylar says H.E.L.P. is designed to offer temporary shelter to people facing homelessness, whether because of a natural disaster or just a matter of circumstance.

Tylar says the packs are portable, contractible shelters with secure internal storage.

When closed, each pack acts as rolling luggage.

They stand at a little over three feet tall and 1-foot-wide, making them easy to transport.

When expanded, each pack acts as a bed. They fold out to be over seven-feet-long and three feet high, which gives more than enough room for the average adult to lie down or sit up.

Right now, H.E.L.P is in the prototype phase. Tylar and a few classmates first thought of the concept three years ago, when they were in just eighth grade, and was even featured on the FabSLAM STEM Action website. (FabSLAM is a team-based digital fabrication competition launched by the Digital Harbor Foundation were students in Idaho, Baltimore and Pittsburgh practice design, and 3D designs and printing.

It started as a drawing on paper and then using a 3-D printer, they were able to bring the design to life.

Since then, Tylar has not given up on the idea. She has continued finding ways to promote H.E.L.P. and to turn it into a reality.

Last year, Tylar was invited to the White House to show off the design to President Obama, as well as top officials from NASA and the National Science Foundation.

Tylar says at this time she is looking for investors and an engineer to help her make this dream a reality.

Here's more information on the Idaho STEM Action Center and FabSLAM.


Trending