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40-year-old Idaho murder mystery still unsolved

What was suspicious about his death is that he'd been shot in the stomach and his hunting rifle wasn't found until two years later about a mile away from where his body was located. (Courtesy Photo)

Oct. 20, 1974, 17-year-old Mark Carlson of Boise drives to Huckleberry Flat, about three miles south southwest of Placerville to go hunting. Two days later Mark was found dead from a single bullet wound.

What was suspicious about this is he'd been shot in the stomach and his hunting rifle wasn't found until two years later about a mile away from where his body was located. His hunting coat was also not located and hasn't been located to this day.

Evidence from the crime scene has police convinced Mark's death was no accident. Mark's family agrees.

"Mark met somebody up there that he knew. Mark never would have went alone because he knew he wasn't supposed to," says Mark's sister Connie Sheldon.

Sheldon says Mark went to the flat with someone from his work.

"There were people who said there was a Volkswagen that was driving around up there looking for somebody… so we believe that's the person he was connecting with," says Sheldon.

By all accounts Mark was an upstanding young man. He worked at the Downtowner Motel in Boise, and coached Little League, and just bought his first car: a blue Mustang.

Sheldon said, "mom had like 9 of us, and he was like the best. The most responsible respectful level-headed kind."

The family says they wont rest until there is a resolution to Mark's case.

"Everyday we talk about Mark. We think about him and just shaking our heads that somebody made a big mistake," says Sheldon. " Out of anybody I know, he's like the last person that deserves something like this. He never picked on anybody, he was just a decent guy a decent person he would've been an awesome husband, father, whatever he was a good brother."

Police and the family are holding out hope somebody will come forward with information.

Capt. Fritz Zeigart with Idaho State Police says, "us as law enforcement really rely on the public to provide us with information, and leads. It may seem small to that person, but it may be that small piece of information that we need to lead us to bigger information which can ultimately lead us to solve cases."

The family hasn't lost hope.

"I'm hoping this person comes forward it's just a matter of time. I know it is it's a matter of time life hasn't been easy on this person and it'd be better for him to just come out with what happened," says Sheldon.


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