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Boise woman on a mission to advocate for more pancreatic cancer research funding

Brenda lost her sister, Heather, to pancreatic cancer when she was just 34 years old.

Hundreds of people will go to Washington DC next week to help advocate for more funding for pancreatic cancer research.

Just one of those hundreds is a Boise woman named Brenda Vogt. Brenda lost her sister, Heather, to pancreatic cancer when she was just 34 years old.

Vogt isn't the only one who's lost a loved one to pancreatic cancer, the cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States.

Vogt decided she would do everything she could to learn about her sister's disease, and even joined the local pancreatic cancer action network.

One of her many goals? To help raise awareness. Vogt said when her sister was diagnosed, it was kind of like a death sentence.

"Pancreatic Cancer unfortunately has the lowest five-year relative survival rate of the major cancers. So a patient diagnosed today, would only have about a 91-92 percent chance of surviving five years. That's a huge number," Vogt said. "For me personally, when my sister has that diagnosis given to her, and the prognosis, it wasn't here is the treatment plan and here is the options and this is the plan we're going to go forward with, it was, you should get your affairs in offer and check out those bucket list items."

Vogt is working hard to change that prognosis.

If you'd like to help, you can participate in the Purple Stride walk on September 9. The goal is to raise $54,000 to help fight the disease.


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